Jon Ossoff, the candidate in the special election race for Georgia’s 6th Congressional District, admitted at an event in Sandy Springs that he didn’t live in the district. As reported by Alex Roarty, who covers the Democratic Party for McClutchyDC.com, Ossoff said that he had moved South of the district line.

That may explain his failure to show at recent events in the district, since he lives too far away it makes it hard for him to get there! And getting out our maps, it also makes it clear why he sounds so much like the other democrats from Georgia’s 5th Congressional District (i.e., Atlanta) who are clamouring about the election to the North of them in the 6th district, because he is one of them! However, people from the 6th District don’t like people from the 5th telling them what to do, certainly not picking their candidates for them!

Roarty covered an event where Ossoff met with 150 supporters at a Jewish temple in Sandy Springs, Georgia. Ossoff said that he had “spoke several times” with representatives from the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee (DCCC) and that they had been “supportive”, which shows more involvement than in the past.

The committee has also been in regular contact with Ossoff, and during an interview, the candidate himself praised its assistance.

The DCCC is not supposed to support one Democratic candidate over another, so that shows how the moneyball game works where O$$off is the guy with the dollars, spends his time meeting with the big donors rather than meeting with constituents, and the political establishment falls all over themselves to help the guy with the money whom they think can win! That strategy didn’t work very well for Hillary Clinton, though, and we think it’s not going to go over any better in the 6th.

Moneyball

The Georgia Democrats call themselves the “Inisiders Baseball Club”.

He also has gotten several endorsements recently, including from End Citizens United. Tiffany Muller, Executive Director of that organization said that they endorsed him in part because is a “viable candidate.” As quoted by Roarty:

We have these really encouraging signs about how much money he has.

Here’s another one with the “most viable” argument, flippable_org. When are candidates going to actually start talking and listening to people, instead of following the $$ game? And another thing, how does a previously unheard of 30-year-old with no political experience suddenly raise $2M? Did John Lewis and Hank Johnson have something to do with it? They’re always invoked when these organizations justify why they give a rubber stamp to a total unknown. Are they picking their next “insider guy” for Congress?

One Response

  1. Scott McDaniel

    “To run for office, you have to meet certain criteria. If you’re a candidate for the United States House of Representatives, you have to be at least 25 years old and have been a U.S. citizen for at least seven years. But there’s no requirement that you live in the congressional district you are vying to represent.

    It’s Spelled Out In The Constitution.”
    http://knkx.org/post/why-dont-congressional-candidates-have-live-districts-they-seek-represent

    Jon is both close to the district and grew up here. There’s no sudden border when it comes to the districts and their political relevance, especially when gerrymandering by both parties is such a thing enormously weighed in favor of keeping incumbents in.
    If he had just moved in next door or was significantly far away, this argument would have more weight, but he’s within a half the distance I commute daily.